Geordie Day Storyhive Interview

The Edmonton/Calgary Storyhive projects have begun! And to help you decided who you’re going to vote for, I’ve got a couple interviews with some of the Project creators. Starting with Geordie Day and his Art Punk project:

As you can see (or may know) the project focuses on an event very important to the Edmonton Street Art community. With my interest in that community (as well as owning a couple of Daft Punk/Jamie Law pieces) I just had to hear more about how this project.

So I sent the documenter Geordie Day a few questions over the internet and this is what he had to say:

What was the genesis of Art Punk? How did you and Jamie Law get together?

Geordie Day: I was working on a show for CBC about culture in Edmonton and I did a story on Jamie. I pitched him the idea of doing a documentary and he was into it. 

Why the Storyhive platform?

Geordie Day: Because Storyhive is a great way to promote your project and get people interested in it while potentially getting funding. I really like the idea of art funding being democratic opposed to some bureaucracy deciding what’s worthy based on arbitrary standards. It’s what our film is about – public art. 

Are there plans to talk to any other Edmonton Street Artists in your documentary?

Geordie Day: Of course! 

What kind of impact do you think Art Punk could have on the Edmonton Arts community?

Geordie Day: I grew up in Calgary feeling like I needed to get out to get into film but I don’t feel that way now. There are a million films about New York’s art scene but very few about Alberta’s. It’s new, it’s unique and it’s unexpected.

A little while ago, there was a This American Life about an Amish rapper and it was one of their more popular episodes. It was way more interesting than any doc about Kanye West. Bigger isn’t always better. Often times it isn’t. PS – I love Kanye West but I’m talking about story here! 

What interests you most about the Edmonton Street Art Scene?

Geordie Day: There’s this misconception that Albertans don’t care about art and a lot of them do. The police services in Edmonton were just doing their jobs. They were cracking down on street art in Old Strathcona because traditionally the general public has been against graffiti.

In this case, a lot of Edmontonians were very supportive of Jamie. They would rather see a mural than another concrete wall. That’s why street art makes so much sense in Edmonton, because it’s a concrete city where really cool people live and they want more. 

What’s your favourite Daft Punk/Jamie Law piece?

Geordie Day: That’s tough! I really liked the giant Joker he did. But what I like most is that his work is family friendly and fun. He has “punk” in his name and it’s in the title of the movie, but it’s in an open-ended sense. Some people feel he’s a punk but others empathize. I think he just wants to see Edmonton’s aesthetic more representative of its people. 

How can people help get Art Punk made?

Geordie Day: Vote at Storyhive! http://yycyeg.storyhive.com/project/show/id/158?fbt=share

Who is your favourite Ninja Turtle?

Geordie Day: Leo! No Raph. No, Leo! Definitely Leo!

Did Mr. Day convince you to go out and vote? Are you interested in more? Check out the Edmonton/Calgary Storyhive hub and make sure to throw some votes Geordie’s way.

But don’t spend all your votes! I’ll have another interview for you on Monday with a Calgary based creator and his project, so stay tuned!

Jay Runham

Edmonton, Canada

My name is Jay Runham, I design and build websites, I eat Hummus, I create rich graphic elements and dabble in many different multimedia worlds (including iPhone web development). Design is my passion and I love to create, debate and stimulate conversations about the different aspects of design in our multimedia world today. I take pride in being a Canadian web developer and I’m looking to further my local Tech scene here in Edmonton, Alberta. Want to pick my brain? Or maybe just wondering what my favorite color looks like next to yours? Find a way to connect with me and let me know what you're passionate about.